Brandikaran | City Pays US$345,000 For Rebrand, But New Logo Is C-Riously Too Familiar
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City Pays US$345,000 For Rebrand, But New Logo Is C-Riously Too Familiar

City Pays US$345,000 For Rebrand, But New Logo Is C-Riously Too Familiar -

City Pays US$345,000 For Rebrand, But New Logo Is C-Riously Too Familiar

Are you C-ing triple? You’re not alone.

The Cork City Council in Ireland recently made local news after announcing that it had invested nearly €300,000 (US$345,000) on a new branding system that would potentially elevate itself as an attractive destination to the world.

Despite the handsome price paid to accentuate its personality, the city ironically landed itself in an identity crisis.

A reader of the Irish Examiner pointed out to the newspaper that the logo for the new ‘We are Cork’ campaign appears to be the spitting image of the lettermark for food website Great British Chefs.

The two designs are already similar at first glance, but a closer look will tell you that they’re even inherently alike. The ‘We are Cork’ logo entails a capital ‘C’ that’s made up of 27 lines, while the ‘C’ branding of the Great British Chefs is formed by 27 knife illustrations.

When the newspaper enquired about the likenesses, a spokesperson for the Cork City Council replied that intellectual property solicitors had run a “full search” on the logo, created by Belfast-based design firm Collaborate, via the Irish and European Union Trade Mark Registers before confirming the design.

“The search confirmed that the mark was available to register and use,” the spokesperson added. Following the check, the council registered the logo as an EU trademark with the European Union Intellectual Property Office.

Ken O’Flyn, former Deputy Mayor of Cork, has also griped in a Facebook post that the new design seems to be an “astonishing” doppelgänger of the Museu de Cultures del Món de Barcelona logo, which comprises 31 straight lines.

“Can you spot the difference between this museum in Barcelona‘s logo and [the] ‘We Are Cork’ one? I certainly can’t,” he said.

Coincidence or copy? Your call, champ.

 

[via Irish Examiner, images via various sources]

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