Brandikaran | Emojis’ Japanese Origins Explored In Latest Graphic Standards Manual
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Emojis’ Japanese Origins Explored In Latest Graphic Standards Manual

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Emojis’ Japanese Origins Explored In Latest Graphic Standards Manual

Emoticons have become so integral in communication that they’ve come to achieve what punctuation marks were never able to. As plain text can be so easily misconstrued, these graphics bring clarity to the table and set the tone for any message, be it a sarcastic or flirty one.

Since they’re so commonplace, it’s easy to forget that the international language of emoji stemmed from Japan. In 1999, its 25-year-old originator, Shigetaka Kurita, designed and released 176 icons for telecommunications company NTT DOCOMO. Unbeknownst to them, the trend would blow up in other parts of the world 12 years later.

“Various things influenced emoji,” Kurita recalled. “One was the pictogram. Pictograms are used as signs in many places in Japan like stations and public places. The second was the Japanese art of Manga, which uses graphics to express emotion. Lastly, it was Japanese magazines. All of these things that organize and communicate information came together to influence the creation of emoji.”

In 2016, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) acquired the original set, which comprised of tiny faces, objects, and places, drawn on a 12-by-12 pixel grid. Today, there are over 1,000 direct descendants of the 176 emoji.

Now, Standards Manual has put together the first-ever hardcover book and smartphone keyboard of the earliest emoji family.

Simply titled Emoji, the book explores the colorful, unexpected evolution of the humble emoticons, as well as how they have become a language that billions of people speak today.

The keyboard app, built by New York-based developer W&Co., now makes it possible for smartphone users in the Western world to use the original emoji for the very first time. It will be distributed to backers of the book for free, and will be a paid app when the copies are shipped out.

Check out some pages and find out more about Emojihere.

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Image provided by Standards Manual

 

Image provided by Standards Manual via GIPHY

Image provided by Standards Manual via GIPHY

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Image provided by Standards Manual

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Image provided by Standards Manual

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Image provided by Standards Manual

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Image provided by Standards Manual

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Image provided by Standards Manual

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Image provided by Standards Manual

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Image provided by Standards Manual

[Images provided by Standards Manual]

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